As an artist, I have noticed societal pressures to conform to a specific art medium and style, which can lead to monotony and a lack of stimulation. In turn, this can make the creative process tedious and unexciting. 

Creating art solely for commercial purposes can make the process feel laborious and serious, which hinders creativity. Instead, the goal should be to have fun and find happiness in the creative process.

It can also make people less truthful about what they say and say what will connect to the most popular page that will earn them money.

Art as a Way of Life: Challenging Materialism and Discovering Identity

Art is not just about making money or producing pretty pictures. It can be a way of life that challenges the Western concept of materialism. If more people embraced their creativity and became artists, it could positively impact mental health and the environment.

While I do not advocate for a communist system, I believe in sharing wealth equally and giving workers more time to explore the arts. It could be a step towards a society that values creativity and experiences over material possessions.

Furthermore, art can be a powerful tool for social change. Through art, we can address important issues and spark meaningful conversations. Art can challenge the status quo and inspire people to take action.

This art exhibition showcases something very close to my heart and has been a constant subject throughout my life as an artist. The exhibition is titled “Art as a Part of Me, Not Just a Profession.”

Creating Art for Yourself: The Importance of Staying True to Your Vision

Art has been a significant part of my life since childhood, allowing me to express myself freely and authentically. However, I was taught to view my art as a commodity during my education, which disappointed me. I chose to do my art for myself during my degree and as a hobby for many years while I worked full-time as a designer. I wanted to do everything I enjoyed and found interesting without worrying about whether people liked it. Art should not be created solely to please others.

The Motivations Behind the Art: A Colored Graph Analysis

When you browse my art collection, you will notice a coloured bar accompanying each piece, indicating its underlying motivation. These motivations vary significantly, from creating something that sells well online to experimenting with different colours and patterns. I have also highlighted how much of the art was created for fun, learning, experimenting, and improving my overall brand image, which has been recently edgy, as I realised I had to define myself somehow if I needed to sell all my art.

Art Education: An Integral Part of a Well-Rounded Education

Additionally, I’d like to emphasise the importance of art education and how it can benefit society. Art education should not be viewed as a luxury or an add-on but as an integral part of a well-rounded education. It can enhance critical thinking skills, encourage creativity and self-expression, and promote cultural appreciation and understanding. Additionally, I’d like to share my experience with becoming more commercially minded and using social media to find potential revenue. While I understand the importance of selling my art and making a living from it, I have noticed a negative impact on my mental health when I compare myself to others. This competition and pressure to produce art solely to make money has affected my confidence and creativity.

Doing art for yourself is always the best option. I was much happier and fulfilled when I pursued art during my degree and as a hobby. I never needed to compare my work with others or worry about whether it would sell. This competition is killing people’s confidence and creativity, and it’s essential to remember the joy and fulfilment that come from creating art for yourself.

Lastly, I want to stress the importance of supporting local artists and artisans. By supporting local artists, we can help create a vibrant and diverse arts community, boost the local economy, and promote cultural exchange.

With that in mind, I came to the extra bit of my expedition, which was my exploration of AI tools.

Artists who make a living from their art might see AI as a threat. However, I find AI useful as someone who has yet to reach this point. It can help artists with limited time and may need to work full-time in another field.

The problem with AI is not the technology itself but the fact that some people use it to deceive others. When I use AI, I always make it clear that I am using it, either by adding a note at the bottom of my written work or by adding a little title near my artwork. I only use AI on my artwork and will never take AI-generated images and pass them off as my own.

I understand that being trusted in society is crucial, particularly for someone like me who has been unfairly judged due to a lack of formal education. However, I am still educated, and AI can help level the playing field for people like me who might not have had the same opportunities as others. Artists who make a living from their art might see AI as a threat. However, I find AI useful as someone who has yet to reach this point. It can help artists with limited time and may need to work full-time in another field.

The problem with AI is not the technology itself but the fact that some people use it to deceive others. When I use AI, I always make it clear that I am using it, either by adding a note at the bottom of my written work or by adding a little title near my artwork. I only use AI on my artwork and will never take AI-generated images and pass them off as my own.

I understand that being trusted in society is crucial, particularly for someone like me who has been unfairly judged due to a lack of formal education. However, I am still educated, and I believe that AI can help level the playing field for people like me who might not have had the same opportunities as others.

You will find my newly defined findings regarding AI and some experiments and thoughts in this exhibition. Enjoy!